Greek-Inspired Stuffed Eggplant

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Greek-Inspired Stuffed Eggplant

Eggplant is one of my favourite vegetables, and one of my favourite ways to use it is in Greek-style dishes, à la these beautiful stuffed eggplants. Loaded with rice, vegetables and lentils, they make for a really satisfying meal and are bursting with garlic-y, herb-y, nutty and slightly acidic flavours that taste so delicious together! I also love eggplant for it’s health benefits. That dark purple skin is full of anthocyanins, potent antioxidants which help to reduce inflammation and may play an important role in the prevention of many chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease. These take a little longer than my other recipes to prepare, but they’re definitely worth it! I make double the recipe to have for lunch the next day.

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Eggless Omelette

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This one took a few attempts to perfect, but I’ve finally come up with a delicious omelette recipe made with… chickpea flour! It’s fluffy on the inside and slightly crisp on the outside just like an egg omelette, and makes for a great hot breakfast. It even tastes egg-y, but that’s definitely no expert opinion considering I haven’t eaten egg for the past four or so years.

Between the chickpeas and mushrooms, this dish is packed with soluble fibre, which is great for regulating blood glucose levels, reducing high cholesterol and promoting healthy bowels. It’s also got lots of potassium, a mineral we need in large amounts to support nerve function. It may take a few tries to get the omelette right, but it is so worth it! It’s best served straight away while it’s hot, but you can also refrigerate it and heat it up later on.

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Bibimbap

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When I was younger I used to love going to China town on Friday nights with family and getting a sizzling bowl of Korean bibimbap, complete with broth, chilli paste and kimchi. I loved the salty, hot, spicy flavoured rice combined with the crunch of the fresh vegetables (and, in my pre-vegan days, I loved the runny egg on top too). After becoming vegan, I never went back to that Korean bibimbap shop, but a few years later I came across a recipe for vegan bibimbap, which turned out amazingly well! No runny egg or meat needed. This became a bit of a family staple dinner because everyone loved it so much. I’ve changed the classic recipe up a bit so that it includes whole foods only, but it’s just as good as the original. This dish is very much an ‘anything goes’ one – you can add lots of different toppings to it for a bit of a twist (like seaweed, chilli, kimchi, cabbage, or other Asian vegetables and condiments), but keep the rice base, sauce and some fresh vegetables and it will still be bibimbap. Continue reading

Marrakesh Chickpea & Vegetable Curry

This is a Moroccan curry, but it could also pass for a stew. I have to admit, the first time I came across the original version of this recipe I was a bit skeptical. Orange juice in a veggie curry? I wasn’t sure how it would taste -especially with my healthy adjustments- but I was intrigued to try it out. I’m so glad I did, because it tastes amazing! The combination of cinnamon, curry spices and sweetness from the orange juice, sultanas and sweet vegetables go really well together, and the almonds add a nice change in texture from the rest of the ingredients. It’s also got a really diverse nutrient profile, thanks to all of the different vegetables, and it’s full of vitamin A, vitamin C and calcium. The various veggies also make this a really well-rounded source of phytonutrients (there’s almost every colour of the rainbow packed into this dish!). If you’ve got them, coconut yoghurt and mango chutney go really nicely on top.image3 (3)
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Apple Spiced Porridge

Porridge is such a comforting breakfast. So is apple pie. This recipe combines both of these. It’s got a hefty dose of antioxidant-rich spices (gram-for-gram, clove is one of the most potent sources of antioxidants!). There’s lots of soluble fibre from the apple, oats and flaxseeds. The flaxseeds also provide omega-3 fat. It’s perfect for a cold winter morning!

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Is Soy Healthy?

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Whether or not soy is healthy or even safe to consume has been a source of continual controversy over the past few decades. In fact, it’s one of the most researched foods in the world. In the centre of this controversy are it’s effects on hormones and nutrient absorption – and all of the voices for and against it. Mixed messages make for confused consumers, and in such situations it might seem best to avoid soy to be on the safe side. Using research is always important when looking at the nutritional qualities of a food, so I’ve trawled through the latest evidence to come up with the current facts about soy.

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